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    When a firefighter dies, their 'survivors', whom can include their spouse, civil partner, nominated partner and / or children, may be eligible to receive benefits from the FPS 2006.

    Whilst you and your unmarried partner no longer have to complete a declaration form for the partner to be considered for a pension, completion of the form is still advisable as it would confirm your circumstances in the event of your death.

    Death Grant Lump Sum

    If a firefighter dies whilst a serving firefighter, provided they were a member of the FPS 2006 at the time of death (and had not opted-out), a lump sum death grant of three times' their annual pensionable pay will be paid to their surviving spouse, civil partner or nominated partner.

    The Fire & Rescue Authority will pay the death grant to whom they think fit, but you can inform the Authority of your wishes by nominating a beneficiary(s) on the A firefighter can obtain a form from for this purpose from the 'Scheme Guides & Forms' area or from the Pensions Unit.

    Whilst your wishes won’t be binding on the Fire & Rescue Authority, it will help them in their decision-making.

    Pensions for Adult Survivors

    A firefighter's surviving spouse, civil partner or eligible cohabiting partner* will receive a pension:

    • if the firefighter dies whilst a serving firefighter; half of the higher tier ill-health pension to which the firefighter would have been entitled to if they had retired on health grounds on the date of death;
    • if the firefighter was retired on the date of death; half of their pension ignoring any reduction made for early payment, but after any commutation to provide a lump sum when the firefighter retired;
    • if the firefighter had a deferred pension (because they are no longer a firefighter, or they had opted-out of the scheme) which was not in payment at the date of death; half of the deferred pension.

    * Pensions to an unmarried partner (who is not a civil partner) may be payable providing they are someone with whom the firefighter had a long-term relationship, but to whom they are not married. Like spouses / civil partner pensions, a partner's pension is payable for life, but entitlement is not automatic.

    If you have no spouse or civil partner, it may be possible for a survivor’s pension to be paid (for life) to your partner on the same basis as if he or she had been your spouse or civil partner, but this is not automatic. For a pension to be payable, certain criteria must be met (based on duration, exclusivity and financial dependence or inter-dependence) and evidence of this will be sought in the event of your death.  

    Whilst you and your unmarried partner no longer have to complete a declaration form for the partner to be considered for a pension, completion of the form is still advisable as it would confirm your circumstances in the event of your death. 

    A firefighter can obtain a form from the 'Scheme Guides & Forms' area or from the Pensions Unit.

    If a firefighter's adult survivor is more than 12 years younger than them, the adult survivor's pension will be reduced to reflect the age difference. This reduction will be 2.5% for every year or part of a year over 12 years, up to a maximum reduction of 50%.

    Pensions for Children

    To be eligible for a pension, a child has to be financially dependent on the firefighter, and can be their natural child, step child or an adopted child, or any other child related to them. Any children of the firefighter's adult dependant can be considered eligible, as can a child (ren) born after the firefighter's death where the child's mother was already pregnant at the date of the firefighter's death.

    They will receive a pension in their own right up until their 18th birthday or, if they continue in full time education, to their 23rd birthday. If a child of a firefighter has a disability where they would be dependent on the firefighter by reason of permanent disablement, the pension that would be payable for as long as the disability lasts or until the authority are satisfied that the child is no longer permanently disabled.

    The amount of pension that a firefighter's child will receive is:
    • If the firefighter dies whilst a serving firefighter, one quarter of the higher tier ill-health pension to which the firefighter would have been entitled to if they had retired on health grounds on the date of death. Where there is more than one eligible child, the pension would be one half of the higher tier ill-health pension to which the firefighter would have been entitled to if the firefighter had retired on health grounds on the date of death, divided between the children.
    • if the firefighter is retired on the date of death, one quarter of the firefighter's pension ignoring any reduction made for early payment, but after any commutation to provide a lump sum when they retired. Where there is more than one eligible child, the pension would be one half of the firefighter's pension, divided between the children.
    • if the firefighter had a deferred pension (because they are no longer a firefighter, or they had opted-out of the scheme) which was not in payment at the date of death, one quarter of the deferred pension. Where there is more than one eligible child, the pension would be one half of the deferred pension, divided between the children.

    If the firefighter dies leaving no adult dependant, but there is an eligible child(ren), an additional pension would be paid to them amounting to what would have been paid to an adult (if there is one child) or, where there are two or more children, this additional amount is divided equally between them.