Welcome to the pension website for serving and former police officers. This site is a hub of pension information which will hopefully serve you well during your career and in your retirement.

 More information about how you can help protect yourself can be found under the 'Transferring' section in the menu above.

View the short Video from the Pensions Regulator.

About Kier

Kier is one of the UK's largest providers of outsourced professional and support services to local authorities. We also support other public bodies, including the police and fire and rescue services through long-term strategic transformational partnerships.

Kier is one of the UK's largest providers of outsourced professional and support services to local authorities. We also support other public bodies, including the police and fire and rescue services through long-term strategic transformational partnerships.

The Kier Pensions Unit administers pensions for a range of public sector and selected private sector schemes.

Predominantly focusing on the public sector schemes, Kier administers for over 210,000 scheme members right across the country. Including 24 different clients and over 200 individual employers.

Kier administers over half of the Police Pension Schemes in England and Wales.

Further information about Kier and its corporate strategy, markets and financial performance can be found on our website at

Latest News

Annual Benefit Statements – Active members (updated August 2017)

From August 2017, contributing members of the 1987, 2006 and 2015 Police Pension Schemes will receive their 2017 Annual Benefit Statement.

We have adopted a similar style to that used in 2016, in that it will cater for those members who are (or will be) moved into the Police Pension Scheme 2015 (PPS 2015)

The main change this year concerns 1987 scheme members – who are, or will be, affected by PPS 2015 – having a second projection at age 55 (where their rank gives them a Normal Pension Age of 55 in PPS 1987) as well the projection at age 60.

Once again, the statements will contain generic notes with scheme-specific Annual Benefit Statement notes housed on the 'Scheme Guides and Forms' page of the member's appropriate scheme.

In the case of PPS 1987 and PPS 2006 members, the notes are housed as two documents: one set for fully protected members and a second set for those who have (or will at some point) move into PPS 2015.

Annual Benefit Statements – Deferred members

From 30 June 2017, former scheme members of each of the Police Pension Schemes will receive their 2017 Annual Benefit Statement.  We have kept the design similar to last year, in that members receive generic notes accompanying their current pension values with scheme-specific notes explaining deferred benefits from the particular scheme appropriate to the former scheme member.

The notes can be found on the ‘Deferred Benefits’ page once the applicable scheme has been selected (from the tabs above).
Please select the scheme that you were a member of at the time you left pensionable service. 

So, if you were a PPS 1987 or PPS 2006 member who transitioned into PPS 2015 (at any point from 1 April 2015), please refer to the ‘Deferred Benefits’ page within PPS 2015.

Commutation News Last Updated 21/2/2017

The commutation exercise has been completed, but for a handful of payments which we are working on. In the main, these payments are due to the estate of Officers who have passed away.

If you believe that you are entitled to a payment under this review and have not received this yet, get in touch with us by calling 01642 727040 or send an e-mail to us using pencom@kier.co.uk.

Please could you have a read of the briefing note below to ensure you meet the criteria before getting in touch. If you are not sure, please let us know.

Scheme Regulations & Guide Published

The Police Pension Scheme Regulations 2015 have been laid before parliament, coming into effect from 1/4/2015.


Police Pension Scheme 1987 (PPS 1987)
 
Contributions
 
Benefits On Retirement
 
Increasing Your Benefits
 
Death Benefits
 
Deferred Benefits
 
Leaving the Scheme
 
FAQ's
 
Scheme Guides & Forms

This section of the website is for Officers who joined the Police Force before 6th April 2006 and who didn't elect to join the Police Pension Scheme 2006 (PPS 2006) when they were allowed to do so as part of the national Options Exercise.

The PPS currently operates on a final salary basis which means that your pension benefits are based on your pay at the time you leave the force and your length of service.

Key Features
  • All new recruits to the police service before 6 April 2006 became members of PPS, unless they opted out of the scheme.
  • The majority of Police officers contribute 14.25% of their pay to the scheme, which represents just under a third of the cost of providing pension benefits.
  • PPS is a 'final salary' scheme, which means that your pension is calculated as a proportion of your final average pensionable pay. This is generally pay in your last year of service as a member of the scheme.
  • The pension that you will receive depends on your pensionable service, which for most officers will be the length of service in the police force for which they have paid pension contributions, with appropriate adjustments for part-time service.
Pension benefits for police officers
  • The earliest date that a pension can generally be paid is 50, depending on length of service (if you have 30 years pensionable service, you may retire with an immediate pension before age 50 and an ill health pension is payable immediately).
  • 30 years service is needed for a maximum pension.
  • A maximum pension is two-thirds of average pensionable pay.
  • There is an option to exchange ('commute') part of the pension for a tax-free lump sum.
  • Average pensionable pay is in effect the highest pensionable pay for the three years before retirement.
  • Each year of pensionable service for the first 20 years gives entitlement to a pension of 1/60 of final pay and each year for the final 10 years gives 2/60, up to a limit of 40/60.
  • Pensions in payment are generally increased for inflation (though only from the age of 55 unless the officer is medically retired or other conditions satisfied).
Benefits for others on the death of a police officer
  • A lump sum death grant of two times pay.
  • A pension for a widow, widower or surviving civil partner, normally of half of the officer's pension entitlement, which ceases on remarriage, the formation of a new civil partnership or cohabitation. A pension is not payable to a surviving cohabitee who was not married to nor in a civil partnership with the officer.
  • Dependent children under the age of 23 may qualify for a pension.

Medical retirement and ill-health pensions

  • A police authority has discretion to retire a police officer on the grounds that he or she is permanently disabled for the ordinary duties of a member of the police force.
  • An immediate pension and lump sum is payable to any officer at any age who is granted ill-health retirement.
  • The issue of permanent disablement is determined by a doctor and there are appeal rights against medical decisions.
  • Ill-health pensions are increased for inflation throughout their payment.
  • Police authorities have discretion to review the payment of ill-health awards at intervals.
  • Even if you are judged to be permanently disabled, it does not automatically follow that you will be granted ill-health retirement. The police force will consider whether there are alternative duties that you could perform and still remain in the service (taking account of your overall capabilities).
  • There are separate arrangements for the payment of injury awards to officers who are permanently disabled as the result of an injury on duty, which are outside of the pension scheme.
Other features
  • There is a facility to buy more pension in the scheme ('added years') within the overall limit of 30 years.
  • If you build up pension rights in the scheme but leave the police service (or opt out of the scheme) before retirement, you will be eligible for a 'deferred pension' payable at age 60.
Police Pension Scheme 2006 (PPS 2006)
 
Contributions
 
Benefits On Retirement
 
Increasing Your Benefits
 
Death Benefits
 
Deferred Benefits
 
Leaving the Scheme
 
FAQ's
 
Scheme Guides & Forms

This section of the website is for Officers who joined the Police Force after 6th April 2006 or who elected to transfer their accrued PPS benefits to the PPS 2006 in 2006 / 2007 during the national Options Exercise.

The PPS 2006 currently operates on a final salary basis which means that your pension benefits are based on your pay at the time you leave the force and your length of service.

Key features

All new recruits to the police service from 6 April 2006 onwards become members of PPS 2006.

  • Police officers contribute between 11% and 12.75% of their pay to the scheme, which represents about one-third of the cost of providing pension benefits.
  • PPS 2006 is a ‘final salary’ scheme, which means that your pension is calculated as a proportion of your ‘final pensionable pay’. This is generally earnings in your last year of service as a member of the scheme.
  • The pension that you will receive depends on your pensionable service, which for most officers will be the length of service in the police force for which you have paid pension contributions, with appropriate adjustments for part-time service.
  • PPS 2006 is funded by the contributions from officers and police authorities, topped up by central Government.

Pension benefits for police officers

  • The earliest date that a pension can be paid is 55.
  • 35 years’ service is needed for a maximum pension.
  • A maximum pension is an annual payment of half of final pay, plus an automatic tax-free lump sum of four times the annual pension.
  • Final pay can take account of pay in up to 10 years prior to retirement, if this would give a bigger pension.
  • Each year of pensionable service gives entitlement to a pension of 1/70 of final pay, up to a limit of 35/70.
  • Pensions in payment are increased for inflation.

Benefits for others on the death of a police officer

  • A lump sum death grant of three times’ pay is payable and you have some freedom to nominate who should receive it.
  • A pension for a spouse or civil partner is payable for life – these are normally half of the officer’s pension entitlement.
  • A partner who is neither a spouse nor a civil partner may be eligible for a pension payable for life, subject to meeting the necessary criteria.

Dependent children under the age of 23 may qualify for a pension.

Other features

  • An immediate pension and lump sum is payable to any officer at any age who is granted ill-health retirement.
  • There is a facility to buy more pension in the scheme (‘added years’) within the overall limit of 35 years.
  • It is possible to exchange all or part of the lump sum for more annual pension.
  • Every officer has an opportunity to opt out of the scheme.
  • If you build up pension rights in the scheme but leave the police service (or opts out of the scheme) before retirement, you will be eligible for a ‘deferred pension’ payable at age 65.

Pensions for unmarried partners on the death of a police officer

  • An important feature of the scheme is the provision for the payment of a pension for life to a police officer’s partner, even if you are not married to each other or in a civil partnership. But you must satisfy a number of conditions and you and your partner must complete all the necessary documentation – otherwise no pension can be paid.

Medical retirement and ill-health pensions

A police authority has discretion to retire a police officer on medical grounds. In common with other leading public sector pension schemes, there are two levels of ill-health pension:

  • A standard ill-health pension, payable if you are disabled for the ordinary duties of a member of the police force. If you are entitled to a standard ill-health pension, you will receive immediate payment of the pension benefits which you have built up at the date of your ill-health retirement.
  • An enhanced top-up ill-health pension, payable in addition to a standard ill-health pension if you are disabled for any regular employment (meaning employment for an annual average of at least 30 hours per week). If you are entitled to an enhanced top-up ill-health pension, you will receive immediate payment of pension benefits as with a standard ill-health pension, but the top-up has the effect that your pensionable service is enhanced by up to 50% of your prospective service to age 55. For example, if you are aged 35, the enhancement of service is up to 10 years.

The level of disability is determined by a doctor and there are appeal rights against medical decisions. Both types of pension will be increased for inflation for as long as they are paid. Police authorities have discretion to review the payment of ill-health awards at intervals.

Even if you are judged to be disabled, it does not automatically follow that you will be granted ill-health retirement. The police force will consider whether there alternative duties that you could perform and still remain in the service (taking account of your overall capabilities).

There are separate arrangements for the payment of injury awards to officers who suffer injury on duty, which are outside the pension scheme.

Other points

  • The scheme does not have a formal Additional Voluntary Contribution (AVC) arrangement, but you are free to make contributions to personal pension schemes as well as the police scheme within very wide limits.
  • It is possible for deferred pensions (payable at age 65) to be paid early on request, but this will be subject to “actuarial reduction” to reflect that they will be paid earlier and for a longer period.
Police Pension Scheme 2015 (PPS 2015)
 
Contributions
 
Benefits On Retirement
 
Increasing Your Benefits
 
Death Benefits
 
Deferred Benefits
 
Scheme Guides & Forms
 
Protection
 
Leaving the Scheme
 
FAQ's
 

This section of the website is for officers who joined the Police Force after 1st April 2015 or who have been entered into the scheme following the end of their protection from either the Police Pension Scheme 1987 or Police Pension Scheme 2006.

The Police Pension Scheme 2015 (PPS 2015) operates as a Career Average Revalued Earnings (CARE) pension scheme. This means that for each year you are an Active Member you will earn a fraction of your Pensionable Earnings for that year as earned pension. This will be revalued for each subsequent year until you retire.

Key Features

  • Earned pension will be added to your pension pot in each year of pensionable service under the 2015 Scheme, and will be revalued at the end of each year.
  • Whether you work full-time or part-time your earned pension is built up in the same way.
  • The 2015 Scheme is funded by the contributions from members and Police Pension Authorities (e.g. the Chief Constable).

Pension benefits for members

  • The Normal Pension Age is 60.
  • The Normal Minimum Pension Age is 55; this means you can retire at any time from age 55 and receive immediate payment of your pension.  Where benefits are claimed from age 55, but before age 60, 2015 Scheme benefits will have an early retirement reduction applied.
  • You may remain an Active Member of the 2015 Scheme as long as you wish (there is no maximum period of service). If you decide to continue in service beyond age 60 there will be a late retirement increase applied to your pension as it will be paid later than it would be in normal circumstances.
  • Whilst you are an Active Member, the rate of revaluation applied at the end of each Scheme Year (31 March) to the earned pension accrued for that year is the movement in the Consumer Price Index (CPI) + 1.25%. The revalued amount forms the opening balance of your pension for the next Scheme Year.
  • For each Scheme Year that you are an Active Member of the 2015 Scheme, your earned pension is 1/55.3th of the value of your Pensionable Earnings for that Scheme Year (uprated by CPI + 1.25%).
  • Pensions in payment to members are increased every year in line with CPI under the Pensions (Increase) Act 1971.

Benefits for others on the death of a member

If you should die whilst serving as an Active Member then:

  • A lump sum death grant of 3 times your Final Pay is payable if your period of service was at least 12 months (otherwise it's 3 times your annualised final pay).

If you die whilst a member of the 2015 Scheme:

  • A pension will be paid to your spouse or civil partner for the rest of their life.
  • A partner who is neither a spouse nor a civil partner may be entitled to payment of a pension for life, subject to meeting the necessary criteria.

Eligible children under the age of 23 may qualify for a pension.

Other Points

  • You will be able to commute part (up to 25%) of your pension at a rate of 1:12; therefore for every £1 of pension given up you receive a lump sum of £12.
  • Purchasing added pension (where you can increase your pension by paying additional contributions) is currently limited to £6,500 per year. The limit may be altered by HM Treasury (HMT). Added pension is revalued by CPI in line with the Pensions (Increase) Act 1971.
  • The 2015 Scheme does not have a formal Additional Voluntary Contribution (AVC) arrangement, but you do have the option to make contributions to a separate personal pension scheme in addition to your contributions to the 2015 Scheme within limits prescribed by HMRC.
  • It is possible for Deferred Pensions (payable in full at your State Pension Age) to be paid early on request, but this will be subject an early retirement reduction to reflect that they will be paid earlier and for a longer period.
  • Deferred Pensions can also be paid early when a Deferred Member is permanently medically unfit for regular employment. These are not subject to an early retirement reduction.
Contact Kier Pensions Unit
Both schemes are administered by Kier from our offices in the North East of England.

Post : Kier Pensions Unit
PO Box 485
Middlesbrough
TS1 9EE.
Office opening hours are :
Monday to Thursday from 8.30am to 5.00pm
& Friday from 8.30am to 4.30pm
Telephone : (01642) 727333


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Thinking of transferring out of the Police Pension Scheme?


Read on and consider very carefully . . . .

Kier has been dealing with transfers in and out of the Police Pension Schemes for many years.

It has become very apparent where transfers are concerned, that some companies are taking advantage of individuals, particularly those who are keen to access their accrued pension benefits sooner than their scheme allows. This is known as ‘Pensions Liberation’, another term for it could be con-artists.

The Pensions Regulator and Kier are extremely keen to avoid members being duped into making decisions about transferring their benefits which can ultimately cost tens of thousands of pounds and cause huge financial problems for scheme members, some of who, have spent the majority of their lives building up these benefits.

The Police Pension Scheme is extremely comprehensive, insofar as it provides lifelong benefits for you and for your family. It is index linked so maintains its purchasing power over the years and is absolutely guaranteed to continue to be paid regardless of the performance of the marketplace, the solvency of your former employer or any other inherent risks associated with the payment of pensions.

By transferring to another company, you do not have this peace of mind.

It has been known for people to transfer benefits to pension companies who on the face of it, seem completely legitimate. There will generally be a promise of quick early release cash with the rest to follow (there are various ways that this cash is promised to you). What generally isn't made clear by these companies is the following:

  • These companies will take a cut (often a very large cut) of your transfer value for their efforts
  • If HMRC find that you have been paid this cash early, they will tax any income (including lump sums), up to 55%
  • You will not have any form of income guarantee (no definitive period over which a pension will be paid)
  • You will have no statutory indexation (generally, your pension will not increase)
  • Your family will almost certainly not receive benefits if you die
  • You will lose your employer's contribution towards your pension

Remember, if it sounds too good to be true, it probably is. We would always advise scheme members to take independent financial advice prior to transferring out to a pension scheme.

We do appreciate that there can be a need for instant access to cash. Please consider the many alternatives available to you and avoid the problems that pensions liberation can cause.

Please read through the documents below, these have been prepared by the Pensions Regulator to advise of the pitfalls of transferring to these companies. Here you will see some real life examples of the working of these unscrupulous companies, and may make you think twice about transferring your guaranteed retirement income to a potential scammer.