Police Pension Scheme 2006 (PPS 2006)

Death Benefits
When you die, your ‘survivors’ (which can include your spouse or civil partner, an unmarried partner who is not a civil partner and children) may be eligible to receive benefits from PPS 2006. The benefits which may be payable will depend on whether you die in service or after you retire and on the length of your qualifying service at the date of your death. If you had opted out of PPS 2006 at the date of your death, any survivors’ benefits would be based on any deferred pension to which you were entitled at the time.

Death Grant Lump Sum
If you die while serving, provided you were a member of the NPPS at the time of death (and had not opted out), a lump sum death grant of three times your annual pensionable pay will be paid to your surviving spouse or civil partner. If there is no surviving spouse or civil partner, the police pension authority, at their discretion, may pay it to a surviving partner (subject to them meeting the criteria for eligibility). 

Where none of the above apply, the police pension authority, at their discretion, may pay it to a person(s) nominated by you to receive the lump sum death grant, should it become payable, otherwise, it will be paid to your estate. It is therefore important that you keep your will up to date to ensure the lump sum is distributed to those you intend for it to go to.

If you wish to nominate someone to receive your lump sum death grant, in the absence of a spouse or partner, you should complete a nomination form. This form can be obtained from ‘Scheme Guides & Forms’.

Please note that a nomination does not override the provision that the lump sum death grant will be paid to a surviving spouse, civil partner or unmarried declared partner.

Adult Survivors
Adult survivors can include spouses, civil partners and unmarried partners who are not civil partners.

All adult survivor awards are payable for life, irrespective of whether the survivor remarries or forms a new partnership. If the adult survivor is also a member of PPS 2006 he/she is still eligible for an award.

If you die in service, and have at least two years’ qualifying service, your spouse or civil partner is entitled to a pension when you die. The pension payable is 50% of the ill-health pension that you would have received if you had been permanently disabled for regular employment at the time of your death.

If you die while you are receiving a PPS 2006 pension, or if you die after you have left the police service with an entitlement to receive a deferred PPS 2006 pension at 65, or if you have opted out of PPS 2006 and are entitled to a deferred pension but die in service, your spouse or civil partner is entitled to a pension if he or she is married to you or has formed a civil partnership with you when you die. The pension payable is 50% of your pension entitlement at the date of your death.

If your spouse or civil partner is more than 12 years younger than you, his or her pension will be reduced to reflect the age difference. This reduction will be 2.5% for every year or part of a year over 12 years, up to a maximum reduction of 50%.

If you married or formed a civil partnership within the six months prior to your death, then the police authority has discretion to withhold your spouse’s or partner’s pension.

Unmarried Partners
An unmarried partner who is not a civil partner is someone with whom you have a long-term relationship but to whom you are not married (if you are of opposite sexes) or with whom you have not formed a civil partnership (if you are of the same sex).

If you have no spouse or civil partner, it may be possible for a survivor’s pension to be paid (for life) to your partner on the same basis as if he or she had been your spouse or civil partner, but this is not automatic. For a pension to be payable, certain criteria must be met (based on duration, exclusivity and financial dependence or inter-dependence) and evidence of this will be sought in the event of your death.  Whilst you and your unmarried partner no longer have to complete a declaration form for the partner to be considered for a pension, completion of the form is still advisable as it would confirm your circumstances in the event of your death. 

As with spouses and civil partners, if your declared partner is more than 12 years younger than you, his or her pension will be reduced to reflect the age difference. This reduction will be 2.5% for every year or part of a year over 12 years, up to a maximum reduction of 50%.

You can obtain a form from the ‘Scheme Guides & Forms’ area. It is your responsibility to keep Kier informed of any changes.

Children
If you die in service or when you are receiving a PPS 2006 pension, or after you have left the police service with an entitlement to receive a deferred PPS 2006 pension, children’s pensions will be payable to:

  • a child who is your natural child, stepchild or adopted child, or
  • any other child who was dependent on you (either financially or by reason of disability) at the time of your death.

Benefits for surviving children extend to a posthumous child of the marriage or partnership if the child’s mother is pregnant with the child at the time of the officer’s death, including the situation where the officer is the mother and dies in childbirth.

The pension payable is generally 25% of the pension entitlement at the date of your death, but if there are more than two children, each receives an amount equivalent to 50% of the pension entitlement divided by the number of children. The pension entitlement for this purpose is on the same basis as for adult survivors, i.e.:

  • if you die in service, and have at least two years’ qualifying service, it is based on the ill-health pension that you would have received if you had been permanently disabled for regular employment at the time of your death
  • if you die while you are receiving a PPS 2006 pension, or if you die after you have left the police service with an entitlement to receive a deferred PPS 2006 pension at 65, or if you have opted out of PPS 2006 and are entitled to a deferred pension but die in service, it is based on your pension entitlement at the date of your death.

Example
An officer retired on a PPS 2006 ill-health pension and he has three dependent children under the age of 19. His ill-health pension is £18,000 per year.

If he were to die, each of his children would receive a pension of £3,000 per year.
A survivor pension for a dependent child is only payable if the child is below the age of 19 unless:

  • the child is in full-time education on a course of at least one year’s duration, in which case the pension is payable whilst full-time education continues but not beyond the child’s 23rd birthday
  • the child is permanently disabled at the date of your death, in which case the pension is payable for life.

A pension payable to a child who receives remuneration from training or employment in excess of a specified annual amount is reduced by the excess. If the excess is greater than or equal to the amount of the pension, then no pension is paid. The specified annual amount, which is varied annually, is the Income Support level for a single person aged 18-24.